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Thursday, September 20, 2012

A dream deferred


A Dream Deferred

by Langston Hughes


What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore--
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over--
like a syrupy sweet?
Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.
Or does it explode?


When the government lowers taxes, they strategically do so for corporations. In turn, those businesses are expected to hire workers. On the contrary, companies tend to proceed cautiously by freezing hiring. Thus, we have 14 percent black unemployment and 12 percent Hispanic unemployment. This is a significant proportion of our society that is not able to improve their financial circumstances or increase their career opportunities. Subsequently, high unemployment causes the economic gap to widen between whites and minorities (not including Asian Americans). According to the Economic Policy Institute, the “top 1 percent” of wealthy Americans are 288 times richer than the rest of the country. How’s that possible? The average median household income is $57,000 versus over $16 million for the “top 1 percent.” For a country self-labeled as the “land of opportunity,” the “American Dream” appears deferred for many Americans. 

Interestingly, the current presidential election unveils the question of economic uncertainty. How much of an impact does the president of the United States or federal government have over unemployment and the creation of jobs?

Another book giveaway of My Flexibility Manifesto, rated five stars via Amazon


Goodreads Book Giveaway

My Flexibility Manifesto by Leonard Wilson Jr.

My Flexibility Manifesto

by Leonard Wilson Jr.

Giveaway ends September 26, 2012.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter to win

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

How to make it in America

America, the home of the rich
"As the proverbial 'American Dream' continues to escape our grasps as a culture, one has to ponder 'What the hell do I do now?'" -- My Flexibility Manifesto: Following Your Passion 2 Success 
Equality in the United States of America is based on equal access to capitalism. The game is capitalism. The rules of the game is the survival of the fittest. You have to be fit to survive. You have the freedom to participate to the best of your skills and ambitions. Thus to the best of your ability, it will allow you to participate in the game. Once you get in the game, you are free to do what you are able to do. Equality is a part of reform Darwinism. It gives you equal opportunity to get in. Survival of the fittest is social Darwinism. It gives you equal opportunity to get in. Survival of the fittest is social Darwinism. There is no real equality but this is the equality we have available in the U.S.A.




If you have ever felt like your back is against the wall and nothing is going right, subscribe to this blog and order My Flexibility Manifesto. It's a powerful, inspirational resource to get you reenergized and refocused. 

Friday, September 7, 2012

Book giveaway


Goodreads Book Giveaway

My Flexibility Manifesto by Leonard Wilson, Jr.

My Flexibility Manifesto

by Leonard Wilson, Jr.

Giveaway ends September 14, 2012.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter to win

Monday, September 3, 2012

What do you fear? Part 2

"As you discover yourself, you will realize that your old friends do not understand or support your growth and ambition to live life on your own terms." - My Flexibility Manifesto: Following Your Passion 2 Success
In my previous article, I discussed the idea of fear and that most people admit possessing a fear of failure. That fear of failure is socially constructed. Through our interactions with information (social media, news, history, books, podcasts, etc.) and our interactions with people (family, friends, classmates, customers, peers, etc.), we develop perceived expectations of ourself. Those expectations sometimes overwhelm us and define us.

In Chapter 4, "Why Are You Scared?" of my book, I recommend several steps to overcome fear. Examining a few of the steps, I will share one of my fears.

  1. Write down your fears. I fear the possibility of being unloved.
  2. Talk to someone you trust about your fears. I confessed to my wife that I was upset that my family did not make more of an effort to be a part of my life, more importantly that of my daughter's. It has been a year and a half since my family has seen my daughter. During that time, a lot has changed for my family  career-wise and income-wise. Thankfully, amazing opportunities have opened up for us, which, will dramatically improve our economic stability. But during that time of struggle, where has the support been? Outside of my parents, where was the family support for me when I was teaching, starting my own business, earning my master's degree, relocating to Tennessee, relocating from Nashville to Memphis, when I was in between jobs?